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PUBH 5380 - ArcGIS Online Exercise: Home

PUBH 5380 Determinants of Health and Health Equity

Alternatives to ESRI ArcGIS

Contact for Help

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Rachel Blume
Contact:
254-710-7046

ArcGIS Online Walkthrough

Built Environment 3

Background

Built Environment, Part 3 (ArcGIS) See the Guide and video for ArcGIS in the Toolbox within the course in 2BU. Increasingly in public health, mapping tools are being used to better understand where people live and the resources (e.g., parks) available to them within their communities. ArcGIS is one mapping tool that is available for examining the availability of resources as well as the demographic make-up of an area. ArcGIS can be used to identify high-risk populations to target for community health interventions. For example, the health status of low socioeconomic status (SES) communities is worse off than higher SES communities. Since income is a significant predictor of health outcomes, public health practitioners often use US Census Data to identify low SES areas for community-level health interventions. For this part of the built environment assignment, students will become familiar with ArcGIS.

Assignment

Students will need to use ArcGIS to identify 4 parks in their selected community that will later be used to conduct a “virtual assessment” using the PARA tool (Built Environment, Part 5).

Deliverables

Students will submit a document (MS Word or PDF format) with screenshots of three maps that include:

  1. A map that includes 4 labeled parks AND population density
  2. A map that includes 4 labeled parks AND income level
  3. A map that includes 4 labeled parks AND education level information for your community of focus.

For each map, include information about the income level, education level, and population density for the parks (see example in the Toolbox).

Data Category Description
ArcGIS Online Data

What are they? These are streaming layers that can be included in our map.

Does it cost any money? These are 100% free to use.

Is it easy to use? The very easiest.

Who creates this data? ESRI (the company who creates ArcGIS) populates a lot of the available data. Additionally, anyone with an ESRI account (including you all) can publish data via ArcGIS Online.

  • This means it is very important to verify the author of the data is trustworthy!

Are there disadvantages? Yes! There is very little analysis that can be conducted on data accessed this way. No worries though, as we are not conducting any analysis today.

Basemap A basemap is the underlying map image that all other data is overlaid.
ACS (American Community Survey) Beginning in 2010, the Census ACS survey replaced the Decennial Census for sampled research data. This is what we will use for income and education data.

 

Steps Images
Step #1: Launch ArcGIS Online and Log In
Step #2: Click Map

Step #3: Save Map

so there are less possible unfortunate accidents

Any name you like is fine.

Step #4: Enable Search Bar to we can then Zoom to Houston, Texas

Step #5: In the search box, type Houston. The pause a moment and select Houston, TX, USA.
Step #6: Explore other basemaps
Steps Images
Step #1: Click the plus and select Browse Layers.
Step #2: Change My Content to ArcGIS Online.
Step #3: Search for Education.
Step #4: Click ACS Educational Attainment Variables - Boundaries.
Step #5: Read description and click Add to Map.

Step #5: Click Layers and then expand the ACS layer.

  • As you zoom out first County and then State boundaries will activate.
Step #6: Click the Legend icon to view the legend.

 

Repeat steps for Adding ACS Education Data, but this time for ACS Medium Household Income.

 

Steps Images

Step #1: Two Ways to Toggle Visibility of Income and Education

  1. Click the eye to toggle a layer's visibility
  2. Drag to reorder layers

Repeat steps for Adding Data, but this time for 2021 USA Population Density.

 

Repeat steps for Adding Data, but this time for USA Parks.

Steps Images
Step #1: Click the Layers icon to view the four layers on our map.
Step #2: Click on a park polygon to view information about that park.
Step #3: Add a Sketch Layer to manually add a label.

Step #4: Add a pin for our park.

  • On the right-hand menu first select the pin you want to use and then click the park to add a pin.

Step #5: Add a label on our pin.

Four Steps

  1. Click the Text icon on the right.
  2. Click where the label should appear on the map.
  3. Type the label under Content on the right.
  4. To make the labels clearer to read, enable Halo.

(Optional) Step #6: To continue to modify this Sketch Layer:

  1. Click the Layer icon on the left
  2. Click the menu options (...) on the Sketch layer
  3. Click Sketch

Repeat for three additional parks.

Students will submit a document (MS Word or PDF format) with screenshots of three maps that include:

  1. A map that includes 4 labeled parks AND population density
  2. A map that includes 4 labeled parks AND income level
  3. A map that includes 4 labeled parks AND education level information for your community of focus.

 

Steps Images

Step #1: Click the Print icon on the left.

  • It may be hidden under More Options (...)

Step #2: Configure Map

  1. Title: The title will appear at the top of the map. Provide a good title.
  2. Page Setup: Select either Letter ANSI A landscape or Letter ANSI A portrait.
  3. File Format: Select either PDF or JPG.
  4. Advanced Options:
    1. Click Set Scale to add a scale bar to your map.
    2. Add your name as the author
    3. Put Class Assignment under Copyright.
    4. Make sure the Include Legend is checked.

Then click Export. The link will appear below. It may take a few moments until the image is built.

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